Oral Health

Disorders of the Lips, Mouth, and Tongue

Disorders of the Lips, Mouth, and Tongue When healthy, the lining of the mouth (oral mucosa) is reddish pink, and the gums, which fit snugly around the teeth, are paler pink. The roof of the mouth (palate) is divided into two parts. The front part has ridges and is hard (hard palate); the back part is relatively smooth and soft (soft palate). The inside and outside surfaces of the lips are distinctly divided by a wet-dry border (the...

Suppurative Parotitis

Often associated with Staphylococcus aureus. Parotitis is an inflammation of one or both parotid glands. There are a number of causes, but the clinical picture remains broadly similar. EMP Herbal Remedy for Mumps Acute bacterial parotitis - This is an acute inflammatory response to bacterial infection which causes erythema (redness), pain, swelling and tenderness over the gland on the side of the...

Cancer and Other Growths of the Mouth

Cancer and Other Growths of the Mouth Oral cancers develop in 30,000 Americans and cause 8,000 deaths each year, mostly in people over age 40. This represents about 2.5 per cent of cancer cases and 1.5 per cent of all cancer-related deaths - a high rate considering the small size of the mouth in relation to the rest of the body. Along with cancers of the lungs and skin, cancers of the mouth are more preventable than most other...

Protecting Against Disease Transmission in the Dental Office

Protecting Against Disease Transmission in the Dental Office Although experts agree it is extremely rare, it may be possible to get an infectious disease during a routine visit to the dental office. Infected microorganisms live in blood and oral fluids, on contaminated instruments and counter tops, and sometimes even in the air. Patients may be exposed to diseases such as hepatitis B and C, herpes simplex virus, HIV, tuberculosis, staphylococci, and other...

Symptoms of Oral Cancer

A whitish or velvety red patch of tissue instead of normal pink membrane in the oral cavity may signal a potential precancerous condition. If left untreated, the discolored patch may grow and begin to feel like a canker sore. The symptoms of oral cancer may include: a persistent lump, sore, or thickening along the side or bottom of the tongue, an the floor of the mouth, inside the cheeks, or on...

Postnasal Drip

Postnasal drip is an annoying complication of various respiratory ailments and generally disappears after the primary ailment clears up. Mucus is a normal product of the nasal passages, but when too much is produced it finds its way into the throat instead of leaving by way of the nostrils. When the condition becomes chronic - for example, from an allergy or prolonged sinusitis - mucus can drip...

The Tongue and it's common diseases

In healthy persons the tongue is red, firm and moist. In ill health, digestive disturbance, fever, or mouth breathing is likely to cause fur and dryness of the tongue. Fur forms most readily during sleep, particularly when the patient is on a milky diet. The tongue is especially likely to be dry in feverish conditions such as septicaemia (blood poisoning), peritonitis, and typhoid fever, when it...

Top Oral Health Tips for Childhood, Teenage Years, Adulthood, Elderly People

Top Oral Health Tips for Childhood, Teenage Years, Adulthood, Elderly People Professor Mike Morgan, Principal Oral Health, Advisor at Dental Health Services Victoria : http://www.dhsv.org.au , gives his top tips for good oral health for all ages Childhood The biggest oral health risk for children is tooth decay, but it can be prevented with good eating and brushing habits. Top tips: Only put water, milk or formula in baby bottles - and never put children to bed with a...

Tooth Disorders

Tooth Disorders To maintain healthy teeth, a person must remove plaque daily with a toothbrush and dental floss. Also, to reduce the risk of tooth decay, a person should limit the amount of sugar consumed. Fortunately, fluoridated water helps reduce this risk. Limiting both tobacco and alcohol use keeps the mouth and teeth healthy, too. Tobacco - whether it’s smoked, chewed, or dipped - makes gum disease worse....

Stomatitis

Stomatitis Stomatitis is an inflammation of the mouth, often a symptom of systemic disease. Fetid breath odour and blood tinged saliva may accompany any ulcerative lesions of the oral mucosa. Etiology! Stomatitis may be caused by infection, trauma, dryness, irritants and toxic agents, bypersensitivity, or autoimmune conditions. Infectious agents include streptococci, gonococci, fusospirochets, Candida...

Disorders of The Temporomandibular Joint

Disorders of The Temporomandibular Joint The temporomandibular joints are the two places - one on each side of the face, just in front of the ears - where the temporal bone of the skull connects to the lower jaw (mandible). Ligaments, tendons, and muscles support the joints and are responsible for jaw movement. The Temporomandibular Joint is The Most Complicated Joint in The Body: It opens and closes like a hinge and slides forward,...

Salivary Gland Infections

Definition : This is a disorder caused by viral or bacterial infection of the salivary glands. Alternative Names : Parotitis; Saladenitis Causes, Incidence, and Risk Factors: The salivary glands are around the mouth. They produce saliva, which moistens food to aid in chewing and swallowing. Saliva contains enzymes that begin the digestion process. Saliva also aids in mechanical cleansing of the...

The Mouth

Examination of the mouth often shows some unhealthy condition of the lining mucous membrane, or of the teeth, gums, tonsils, or tongue. Any such disorder requires treatment to prevent the general health being affected. In local conditions such as thrush, only local treatment is usually required. General diseases may, however, produce signs in the mouth, as ulceration in syphilis, or bleeding of...

Sports Injuries

More than 100 million sports injuries are treated each year worldwide. The principles of sports medicine can be applied to the treatment of many musculoskeletal injuries, which resemble sports injuries but have different causes. For ex-ample, tennis elbow can be caused by carrying a suitcase, turning a screw, or opening a stuck door, and runner's knee can be caused by excessive in-ward rolling of...

Oral Cancer

Causes The role of alcohol and tobacco including chewing tobacco in causing oral cancer cannot be overemphasized. People who use both substances regularly are 35 times more likely to get oral cancer than people who use neither. The dis ease usually affects tissue that is already irritated by jagged teeth, ill-fitting dentures, or habitual chewing on the inside of the cheek. Iron deficiency has...

Urgent Dental Problems

Urgent Dental Problems Certain dental problems require early treatment to relieve discomfort and minimize damage to the structures of the mouth. These problems include some toothaches; fractured, loosened, and knocked-out teeth; jaw fractures; and certain complications that develop after dental treatment. None of these problems is life threatening. Toothaches A toothache may result from a cavity, an abscess,...

Risk of Pertussis

Pertussis is a highly contagious respiratory disease marked by severe coughing. Its common name, whooping cough, comes from the "whoop" sound patients make when they try to inhale during or after a severe coughing spell. There are both severe and milder forms of pertussis. Although pertussis can occur at any age, severe pertussis disease usually occurs in infants and young children who have not...

Green Tea Drowns Your Risk of Mouth Cancer

If slowing down isn't your cup of tea, consider this - slowly drinking and holding green tea in your mouth for a few seconds at a time keeps high levels of antioxidants in your mouth and throat. Scientists believe this could be why green tea drinkers get fewer oral and esophageal cancers than other people. What a great reason to relax over a cup. Another good protection against cancers of the...

Mouth Cancer: Facts, Figures and Top Six Tips

Mouth Cancer: Facts, Figures and Top Six Tips Facts and Figures Mouth cancer is more common in men than women, but the gap is closing Mouth cancer is more likely to affect people over 40 years of age, though an increasing number of young people are developing the condition Smoking, drinking alcohol and poor diet are major risk factors Risk rises dramatically for people who are both smokers and heavy drinkers Early detection and...

Taking Care of Your Teeth and Gums

Looking after your teeth and gums is the key to reducing the amount of dental treatment you need - avoiding gum disease and tooth decay - and keeping your mouth healthy. With the joint efforts of the dentist, the hygienist and you, the patient, fillings and extractions can be avoided or at least kept to a minimum. When you visit your dentist, he or she can advise on getting your teeth and gums...